Florida Unemployment

Posted by supervisor



Update: to go into effect January of 2012 – Florida has made some drastic changes to their unemployment benefits program. How many weeks you get is now determined by what the state’s unemployment rate is. Example: people will get 23 weeks of benefits as long as the unemployment rate is over 10.5%. However, for every half a percent (.5%) that rate goes down, 1 less week of benefits will be given out. The lowest number of weeks you can get is 12 weeks.

How to file a claim for unemployment benefits:

Your benefits will not begin until your initial application is completed and submitted properly. The earliest you can submit a claim the is the day following your last day of employment. You may file a claim online, by telephone, by mail or fax.

  • The preferred way to file a claim for Florida unemployment insurance is online at the following site: Agency for Worforce. If you don’t have a computer at home, many public libraries have free access to computers that the public can use. You can also visit a One Stop Career Center where computer access is free. Check out the link in the information section to find the location nearest to you.
  • If you are unable to file a claim online you may also file by phone by contacting the claim hotline at 1.800.204.2418. Filing a claim over the phone will take about 20 minutes to complete.
  • Lastly, you may file a claim by mail or fax. You will need to get a copy of the AWI-UC310 and the AWI-UCW4V form located in the back of your unemployment book,  or calling the claims hotline. You can find instructions on mailing or faxing your claim here: Florida Jobs

Information needed to file a claim:

When you file for unemployment, the claim application itself can take thirty minutes up to an hour to complete. It is important to allow enough time before starting the process.  To make the things go faster, it is important to have the following information at hand or easily available to you during the application process.  Please be prepared with:

  • Your social security number (SSN)
  • Your State driver’s license or State issued ID
  • Your alien registration number if you are not a US citizen as well as your work permit expiration date
  • The company name, address, and phone number for all employers within the past 18th months
  • Your earnings for the week you are filing
  • Your local union hall number (if applicable)
  • Your DD214 form if you were in the military
  • Your SF50 or SF8 form and a W-2 if you were a federal employee

Filing an Appeal

It is important to understand that just because you file a claim for Florida unemployment does not mean that you will automatically be approved. Instances may arise where a claim that has been filed is denied and should this happen, you have the option to appeal the decision.  For information on the appeals filing process in Florida state please go to the following web page:  Florida Appeals

 

Information:

Florida Unemployment http://www.floridajobs.org/unemployment/
Florida Unemployment
Compensation Claim Book
http://www.floridajobs.org/unemployment/claimsservices/Claim%20Book%20English%2010-07.pdf
Appeal a Claim https://iap.floridajobs.org/IAP_INTER/process.asp
One Stop Career Center http://www.floridajobs.org/onestop/onestopdir/index.htm
Florida Jobs http://www.floridajobs.org

 

2 Responses to “Florida Unemployment”

  1. i have been claiming my week but i have not recived no payment or not card in the mail my adderess is 231shadow lawn lane pensacola fl 32507 my is 850-455-9405

  2. Tadius Pierre says:

    I was laid-off because that job was slow

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